Miele 2016 in Gütersloh

XMAFrontSo, what about this year´s Miele Meet in Gütersloh? Before I start on it, let me remark that I have ridden my ´58 Original a lot this season already. First there was a century in Gütersloh, again, a normal RTF.

XMRFStationXMRFI also met someone I would encounter again a week later at the Miele do, on a nicely restored 1937 model.

Then it was the Big Day. I always look forward to the Miele Meet a lot, and of course it´s nice to go with friends and acquaintances, so this year there were four of us – Werner, a PBP ancien who was on my son´s 1952 Sports which was much too small for him. The lack in size was a good thing for the rest of the group as Werner would probably have been bored to bits by the distance (70km in all) and the average speed (about 20kph).

We met in a place called Werther from which we had chosen a more or less scenic route to Gütersloh.

XMStartWertherAs we relied on one group member´s GPS we got lost of course, but still made it in time. When we had nearly arrived we passed by the huge Miele headquarters and could not resist to depict the group as pilgrims.

XSPilgrimsOnce at the meeting place, the Gütersloh Stadmuseum, municipal museum, we noted that there were not as many participants as in former years, which was the first disappointment. 31 riders had found their way to the event.

XMCarbide XMHeavyMetal XMHeavyM2 XMDynBadge XMCarbRTThe usual heavy metal was hardly punctured by the really interesting bikes, like very early ones or those wonderful sports bikes.

Instead, there was this machine which I personally didn´t like at all. The front Gazelle brake with its weird construction replacing the Gazelle cable rest braze on is only the most obvious instance of modern parts not really being a good idea on a thirties frame. Also the fifties sports chainset was, sorry, an eyesore on the heavy thirties tourer frame. All in all, the machine looked like a Pashley Guvnor re-make.

XMHorrorChainset XMHorrorheadb XMHorrorhbars XMHorrorfull XMHorrorfrontbrakeIn comparison to this some really umkempt bikes felt charming, reminding me of the eighties when I earned some money repairing bikes as a student.

XMPoorGirlStadtmuseum as a backdrop afforded some nice scenes which might have come straight from the fifties.

XMRow2XMRowThere were some really well restored bikes, too, mostly by the same paintwork artist.

XMSameRestoRed XMSameRestoFunnily enough, one of the most interesting bikes was a Bismarck, completely unrelated to the Marque.

XMBismtransf

The transfer says, “Garantie für Hartlötung – rostgeschütze Emaille” – Guarantee for brazed frame and rustproof enamel”

XMBism XMBismHeadb XMBismGearsMy favourite bike this time, though, was a marvel of an originial Mondia, a brand name Miele used in the late twenties/early thirties. It seems to be the only survivor.

XMMondiafull XMMondiaseatt XMMondiaheadb

One of the rare sports bikes was equipped with an alloy shell F&S Model 53 three speed, a technical achievement: It is completely silent in use, no clicking. However, as a friend likes to put it: It´s always good for a breakdown, so it was only made for three years or so.

 

XMMod52

At around midday we set off for the ca. 20km ride through the lush greenery surrounding Gütersloh, which, despite its industry of world wide renown (Miele, Bertelsmann) really is a country town. All participants enjoyed the well planned ride greatly, just like the stop with the usual lunch paid for by Gütersloh town council. The lunch for meat eaters paid for by Gütersloh, that is, as the few vegetarians among us experienced a rather unfriendly and inflexible restaurant staff insisting on us paying in full for our not very original veggie meals, not even deducting the flat rate for our meat meals paid by the town council, I imagine.

XMBreak

View from the restaurant window

So let´s hope the meet returns to its former glory next year.

XMOursOff to collect an NSU lady´s sports from about 1950 in a minute. Of course I´d bought it if it had been a Miele.

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