Monthly Archives: June 2018

Protected: Holten Ride – explanation see post below

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An Inspiring Ride: Retro Classic Holten

Quick trigger warning before I start: The post above, which is set on private, is by no means meant to exclude anyone, only it contains photos on which faces are visible and riders can be recognized. What with all the recent humdrum about new data protection regulations, and press coverage about bloggers possibly being fined for showing faces and not being in possession of written consent by everyone in those photos, I thought it wise not to make them public. The password for this post is obtainable from either me or the owner of the retrokoers website. I would like to say, though, that the private nature of the post means that only people who took part in the ride should write in for the password, sorry about that.

And what was that – the blog wasn´t visible at all for nearly a week – very sorry about an error I committed. When trying to set the photos mentioned above on private, I hit the wrong button, the whole blog vanished, and I didn´t notice at first as don´t read my own blog too often 🙂 When I did notice, internet illiterate me had no idea off hand how to make the mistake good again, so it took a few days.

But now, here we go.

 

Any ride must be great if you can lean your bike onto a bronze pig before the start

and if there´s another one to look on even.

As you don´t get that in too many places, Holten it was again, after a few years of not going to the great KNWU Toertochten that start in the area, see post of yore. This time it was to be a retro ride, of which the Netherlands and Belgium have had that many recently that you can lose oversight. The retrokoers website, which some years ago was still very quick to read now is a really long list of rides all over the Netherlands and Belgium. This is a great development, of course, but if it comes to travelling from the North West of Germany to the South of the Netherlands or even to Belgium, things quickly become difficult. If you then see a ride advertised which is only about 130 kms away from where you live, it´s relatively unavoidable that you go, right?

And it was a good decision, what with the weather being wonderful, attendance high, and the route well planned. We met in the middle of the town, in a place called Smidsbelt, at a café, where the organizers, the tourist office of the town, had erected two long racks onto which riders could hook their bikes for safe storage either with the handlebars or the saddles of their bikes.

Not too many riders came by car, but in any case parking space was ample, and as my son and I were very early, we had the prime parking space – if that matters. So we set about assembling the bikes (and hiding some marvellous vinyl records we had bought in a fleamarket on the way). We had brought my son´s 1952 Miele Sports bike, and my ca. 1982 RIH. We thought we´d be fine with that choice, and while I was, the RIH being a really great bicycle to ride, my son was hard pressed on his relatively heavy tourer when it came to the run over Holterberg with no holds barred and the group dissolved for a few miles. He coped admirably, though, and the great atmosphere of friendly rivalry saw to everybody being included in the spirit. On a personal note, I may add that my recent intensive training had led to me not being the slowest by far after basically 18 months of absence from riding, so that was good too. I battled it out with a group of riders among which there was one to ride a beautiful red Ko Zieleman, a real marvel of a bike.

Start was at 10.30 for the group which was led by Theo de Rooy, a former Pro and a very friendly man indeed. We had met before in some ride or other, and he remembered me and we were greeted with a handshake, which created a familiar atmosphere right away.

The first round of riding was about 35 slowish (25kph) kilometers, with lots of great conversations possible, and everybody in good mood. I talked to the only other RIH rider a lot, brushing up my Dutch, and finding out once more that the frame number of my bike doesn´t match with the usual numbering system employed in the day – four digits, starting with the expected two digit year code, but then one digit is missing.

While it has to be admitted that not every bicycle in use there was a prime museum piece, the group including also some low range cycles, they all were in very good nick technically, so only two punctures occurred, for the mending of which the group waited, making good use of the time by taking photographs, chatting even more, and looking at each other´s bikes. Here´s a quick photo bomb of the headbadges and -transfers I was able to catch, and as you can see, many bicyces were of fascinating provenance.

So, after about 90 minutes we were back for a round of coffee and cakes at the café. Again, bicycles were scrutinized, and some I found fascinating, some others shocking, like this 1920s machine which had obviously been involved in a bad crash some time in its long history. You could see that something was wrong with the angles from just looking at it, and this was the reason:

Ripples under the top tube, right behind the cable clip, and one big bulge under the down tube. Luckily, steel is forgiving, but it´s not nice in any case.

After the break at the café, or, for those who had brought their own sandwiches, on a round bench under a tree, on we went for the next round of riding, roughly the same distance again, but over Holterberg. The peloton again was moving forward at a moderate pace until we came to said hill, and we met again after it, so te group arrived back at Smidsbelt in more or less one batch. Riding in the group was pleasurable in all, discipline prevailed, no dangerous situation occurred, but all those colourful old jerseys made for a really bright outlook.

Two more interesting bicycles:

One, only represented here in details, a Peugeot randonneuse I have portrayed before, with some gold anodized Simplex accents and some nice transfers:

And the other Theo de Rooy´s bike, one he rode in the day when being a pro, and the only cross bike in the group. Great bike, really, but look at the rear dropout and the seat saty top – are those hairlines in the paintwork also cracks in the metal? Let´s hope not, but they look like it, don´t they?

Is this a cracked seat stay tube?

  After a few hours it was packing up again, and back home, but it was very much worth it. I´ll certainly be back next year.